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Courses 2018

Autumn

September
2nd: Fungi Foray. They outnumber our wild flowers by approx 7:1 They cover a wide spectrum of shapes, sizes, colours, aromas, flavours, textures & edibility, welcome to the wonderful world of fungi. This course will explore key identification techniques, habitats, the important roles that fungi play in maintaining a functioning eco-system and of course cooking and preserving techniques. Booking essential.
Adults £40. Children £10 Under 8's free.
To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com or text 07899752447

3rd: Private Event w/ a Home Educators Group.

10th: Wild Foods & Seaweeds, Bamburgh. 10am - 4pm.
Join me at this stunning location on the Northumbrian coast. Castles, pristine beaches, wild foods galore and some of the finest seaweeds you can imagine. Coinciding with the days New Moon to provide super low tides which are perfect for revealing the usually hidden sub-tidal seaweed species. The course will finish with a beach cook up of our finds. £60pp. Limited places and booking essential. Email:

23rd: Autumn Wild Foods. Leeds. 1pm - 5pm. Autumn is a key season in the foragers calendar.
This course will explore a range of in season wild edibles such as; fruits, fungi, berries, seeds, herbs, greens & nuts, how to safely identify, mindfully harvest, cook & preserve them. Our senses play a key role in aiding identification and we will explore these and apply them on the day.
Includes wild snacks and an al fresco cook up of some of our gatherings. I will also bring along a range of preserves for sampling on the day.
Adults £40. Under 18's £10. Under 8's free (1 child per paying adult)
To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com or call 07899752447


26th: Private Event Am. Private Forest School Event PM.

27th: Private Children Fungi Event.

30th: Fungi Foray. North Yorks. 10am - 3pm.
They outnumber our wild flowers by approx 7:1 They cover a wide spectrum of shapes, sizes, colours, aromas, flavours, textures & edibility, welcome to the wonderful world of fungi. This course will explore key identification techniques, habitats, the important roles that fungi play in maintaining a functioning eco-system and of course cooking and preserving techniques. Booking essential.
Adults £40. Children £10 Under 8's free.
To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com or text 07899752447
https://edible-leeds.blogspot.com/2018/09/fungi-foray-sunday-30th-september-10am.html

October
4th: Private Evening Event: Fungi Foray w/ a Scouts Group.

6th: Private Fungi Foray.

7th - 14th: Ireland!
I'll be heading to Dublin to work alongside Ireland's top mycophagist, Bill O'Dea of: https://mushroomstuff.com/about/
You can keep up to date with this trip and its subsequent fungi fun via my Instagram (edible.leeds) and my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/EdibleLeeds/?ref=bookmarks

20th: Private Event, Cumbria.

21st: Fungi Foray. Cumbria. 10am - 3pm.
They outnumber our wild flowers by approx 7:1 They cover a wide spectrum of shapes, sizes, colours, aromas, flavours, textures & edibility, welcome to the wonderful world of fungi. This course will explore key identification techniques, habitats, the important roles that fungi play in maintaining a functioning eco-system and of course cooking and preserving techniques. Booking essential.
Adults £40. Children £10 Under 8's free.
To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com or call 07899752447

27th: Wild Foods & Fungi. North Yorks. 10am - 4pm.
A full day of wild foods and nature immersion. More often than not, in order to get a greater perspective on the various distributions of wild plants and fungi, a greater area of land and their respectful habitats require covering.This full day, coinciding with the turning back of the clocks is all about a deeper exploration. This course will explore key identification techniques, habitats, the important roles that plants and fungi play in maintaining a functioning eco-system and of course cooking and preserving techniques. You will need to be of a reasonable level of fitness and stamina for this event. The chosen route will be along part of the 6 Dales Trail and take in meadow, woodland, waterway, hedgerow and scrub and we will explore; roots, shoots, herbs, greens, fungi, seeds, barks, fruits and flowers. We will cover approx 5 miles over the duration of the day. There will be various stop-offs for short breaks. Includes a cook up of our finds.
Booking essential. Adults £60. Children £20
To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com or text 07899752447

28th: Private Fungi Foray. A guide group foray exploring the wonderful & magical kingdom of  fungi. Includes woodland cook up.

November



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