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Events Calendar 2019

July
4th. Private Event (S)

5th. Coastal Foraging & Wild Food Cooking at Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland.

I'll be hosting short seashore forays, exploring and identifying a range of seaweeds and coastal plants before returning to the castle to create wild food themed dishes for participants to sample. For more information please contact Bamburgh Castle: https://www.bamburghcastle.com/contact




7th. Private Event (D)

8th. Private Event (B)

12th.
4 Wild Seasons Summer Pop Up. Barnoldswick
3 Courses of the finest seasonal ingredients from meadow, hedgerow, woodland & coast. Drinks offer TBC.
£30pp includes free complimentary drink. Add an Orange Door Cocktail for another £5
Booking essential.
50% deposit required to confirm & secure
To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com





August
2nd: Coastal Foraging & Wild Food Cooking at Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland.

I'll be hosting short seashore forays, exploring and identifying a range of seaweeds and coastal plants before returning to the castle to create wild food themed dishes for participants to sample.
For more information please contact Bamburgh
Castle: https://www.bamburghcastle.com/contact


September
6th. 

14th. Private Fungi Event Cumbria

15th: Private Event with ROOTS community group, Settle.

21st/22nd. A weekend of wild food exploration and immersion in the mountains, forests and waterways of Cumbria.

 
Early Autumn is peak fungi season in Cumbria. The hedgerows, meadows and forests too, will be bulging with a diverse array of fruits, berries, herbs, plants & seeds. 
A minimum of 6 hours each day will be spent exploring and gathering from various locations, with sampling, nibbling and outdoors cooking and eating.
By the weekends finish you will have become confident & familiar with a decent range of excellent edible fungi/plants/trees/fruits/berries/cones/lichen - food and drink at home will never be the same...!
Participants do need to be of a reasonable fitness, we wont be hiking to the tops of any serious peaks but we will cover some reasonably challenging terrain.
Weekend £130pp  Single day: £75pp Only 10 places available.
To book: edible.leeds@gmail.com
An itinerary of each day will be provided on confirmation of booking. A 50% deposit is required on booking.

28th & 29th: 

October
5th: Autumn Fungi & Hedgerow Foraging Walk. Leeds. 2pm - 7pm.
On this course we will explore a range of autumn fungi, berries, fruits, plants and seeds and discuss key identification techniques and how to cook and preserve them. Includes woodland cook up with some of the days finds. Adults £40 Children £10. FULLY BOOKED

6th: Autumn Fungi Forage. North Yorkshire. 10am - 3pm. Explore the fascinating world of fungi including edible, medicinal, useful and poisonous. Fungi come in all manner of shapes, colours, aromas and tastes (though some you really don't want to chow down on!). This course will introduce you to a range of interesting fungi, how to identify them, their roles in nature and how to cook and preserve the edible ones. Includes woodland cook up. Adults £40. To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com FULLY BOOKED

13th - 20th.
Teaching and cooking with Wild Mushrooms in Ireland with: https://mushroomstuff.myshopify.com/

26th. Autumn Foraging with The Kindling Trust. Manchester. More details tbc

27th: Autumn Fungi & Hedgerow Foraging Walk. Leeds. 11am - 4pm.
On this course we will explore a range of autumn fungi, berries, fruits, plants and seeds and discuss key identification techniques and how to cook and preserve them. Includes woodland cook up with some of the days finds. Adults £40 Children £10. To book email: edible.leeds@gmail.com

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